Support Your Local Independent Bookstore!

Announcing an update to Books I Can’t Shut Up About! If you’re interested in buying the books I review (and they’re all good!) you can do so right from the review page! I’ve added links to Indie Bound, an affiliation of independent bookstores. You can find a local bookstore and buy the book from them online or visit and buy in person.

From now on, all my reviews will include a link to Indie Bound. To save you some time here are links for the books I’ve reviewed so far. Click the title to see the review, and the book cover to reach Indie Bound:

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Dread Nation

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Kim Reaper: Grim Beginnings

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Pitch Dark

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Children of Blood and Bone

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Prince and The Dressmaker

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Anger Is A Gift

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Dactyl Hill Squad

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Monday’s Not Coming

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Poet X

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org So Done

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Ship It

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org   Odd One Out

Yes, I do get a small percentage of sales, but I’m more interested in supporting local independent bookstores.

Thanks!

If The Dress Fits…

Being true to yourself is easier said than done.

34506912

In this lovely graphic novel, Frances, an aspiring designer makes an outrageous dress for a young woman attending a prince’s ball. The prince is captivated, not by the princess but by the dress.  Prince Sebastian is gender fluid, some days feeling fine in traditionally male clothing, other days loving wearing his mother’s dresses and feeling like a princess. Frances dreams of creating costumes for the Paris ballet and loves designing with drama. Prince Sebastian secretly employs Frances as his seamstress, and together they create Lady Crystallia, Sebastian’s alter ego who soon becomes the fashion icon for the young women of Paris. Secrets like this are hard to protect, especially when Sebastian’s parents have been presenting him with princess after princess, pushing him to get married. At the same time Frances grows frustrated because she cannot be recognized for her work. Eventually they both have to make some difficult decisions in order to move ahead. Jen Wang’s illustrations, in both style and tone, beautifully express the delight, drama and sadness the characters experience. Each chapter is introduced with an illustration of a pattern piece, a nice touch. Overall, this is a moving exploration of balancing what others expect of you with your own dreams. I was surprised to hear some “gatekeepers” saying this graphic novel is for high schoolers. The story is fine for middle schoolers; in fact, it’s important for them to see stories like this. They are in the midst of figuring out who they are, and seeing different ways of being helps sort out the confusion that comes with this journey.

The Prince and The Dressmaker, Jen Wang, First Second