Support Your Local Independent Bookstore!

Announcing an update to Books I Can’t Shut Up About! If you’re interested in buying the books I review (and they’re all good!) you can do so right from the review page! I’ve added links to Indie Bound, an affiliation of independent bookstores. You can find a local bookstore and buy the book from them online or visit and buy in person.

From now on, all my reviews will include a link to Indie Bound. To save you some time here are links for the books I’ve reviewed so far. Click the title to see the review, and the book cover to reach Indie Bound:

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Dread Nation

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Kim Reaper: Grim Beginnings

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Pitch Dark

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Children of Blood and Bone

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Prince and The Dressmaker

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Anger Is A Gift

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Dactyl Hill Squad

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Monday’s Not Coming

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Poet X

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org So Done

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Ship It

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org   Odd One Out

Yes, I do get a small percentage of sales, but I’m more interested in supporting local independent bookstores.

Thanks!

So Done

Best friends for ever?

35068789Best friends Jamila Phillips and Metai Johnson live in the Pirates Cove housing project. Metai lives with her grandmother. Her African American father and Korean American mother were teenagers when she was born. Her father, now 28, comes around occasionally, is usually high and has never figured out how to be an adult. Her mother is gone from her life entirely.  Jamila lives with her father and 2 brothers; her drug addicted mother has been banned from the home. Her dad is loving, attentive, and does everything he can to make sure they have the best opportunities.  It’s the summer before 8th grade, and Jamila has just come back from spending the last few weeks with her aunts and older sister in The Woods, a nice neighborhood where she gets to live a different kind of life. Where Metai loves the Cove and even enjoys the daily drama, Jamila gets tired of the pettiness and always having to watch her back; she feels like a different person in The Woods. Jamila and Tai are reunited and reconnect with the other girls in their squad, but it’s clear things are changing between them. Jamila doesn’t want to be called by her old nickname, Bean, is excited about continuing her ballet classes, and is looking forward to auditions for a new performing arts program being offered in their community. Tai thinks she should have the right to call Jamila whatever she wants, hates ballet (but loves jazz dance) and is annoyed at Jamila and other Cove friends for getting excited about the program – she sees it as another “let’s help out these ghetto kids” plan that will be gone in a year.  Jamila and Tai also clash over welcoming a new girl into their group. Jamila wants to get to know her, but Tai just wants to be sure the girl knows her place. Jamila and Tai both want to hold on to their friendship but it gets too hard. Eventually they face the real thing causing Jamila to keep her distance from Tai and wanting to leave the Cove – something they both know to be true but have never spoken about.

Jamila and Tai’s story deals with issues many young people confront at this age – friends growing in different directions, seeing the world differently and envisioning different futures for themselves. I really appreciate this not being a simplistic good/bad story, as both girls’ worldviews are respected. Tai successfully navigates her environment, overcoming challenges to make the most of it. Jamila yearns for something different, understanding she may need to leave the Cove to become the person she wants to be. Additionally, this story reminds us that young people have complex lives, some made even more complicated by the adults around them. In the end, we see a realistic journey of these young teens trying to grow up without growing apart.

I can’t end this review without talking about the cover. It is often not the case,  but here we have a beautiful depiction of  Metai and Jamila, looking just as they’re described in the book. And, even though they’re close, you can see the tension between them. Kudos to the artist and designer.

So Done, Paula Chase, Greenwillow Books