Black Enough?

What does that mean? Who gets to decide?

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This collection of stories by some of the best young adult authors writing today examines what it means to be a young black person. Are you still black if you’re a Star Wars nerd? Into tech? A fan of Harry Potter and Percy Jackson? A debate champ who’s also a metalhead? Are open about mental health issues?  Love the outdoors? Wonder if you have to code switch within the black community? These are just a few of the issues teens confront here. As in real life, the young people in these stories are privileged, poor, queer, straight, artistic, insecure, confident, have families that are Afrocentric, and families where blackness is not at the forefront. Black youth coming from all types of backgrounds deal with questions of legitimacy. Although they have different experiences and expectations, they often feel judged against some vague set of standards, making it difficult to feel like they’re “doing it right.”  This raises an important question – is judging a person’s blackness actually buying into stereotypes about ourselves? Regardless, I have no doubt a wide variety of young people will find themselves in these stories. This will also resonate with a lot of adults as one of those “I wish I had this when I was a teen” books.

If you aren’t black, read this book anyway. Anyone from a culture where people feel free to call your authenticity into question will relate to the stories in this collection.

In case you’re still wondering, Ibi Zoboi, editor of this collection, answers the question. She hopes that “…Black Enough will encourage all black teens to be their free, uninhibited selves without the constraints of being black, too black or not black enough.” In other words, the answer is yes, you, in all your nerdy, swaggerific, techy, metal music loving, sneakerheaded, privileged, struggling, code switching self, are black enough.
Click here to buy Black Enough from an independent bookstore!

 

Support Your Local Independent Bookstore!

Announcing an update to Books I Can’t Shut Up About! If you’re interested in buying the books I review (and they’re all good!) you can do so right from the review page! I’ve added links to Indie Bound, an affiliation of independent bookstores. You can find a local bookstore and buy the book from them online or visit and buy in person.

From now on, all my reviews will include a link to Indie Bound. To save you some time here are links for the books I’ve reviewed so far. Click the title to see the review, and the book cover to reach Indie Bound:

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Dread Nation

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Kim Reaper: Grim Beginnings

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Pitch Dark

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Children of Blood and Bone

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Prince and The Dressmaker

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Anger Is A Gift

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Dactyl Hill Squad

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Monday’s Not Coming

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Poet X

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org So Done

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Ship It

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org   Odd One Out

Yes, I do get a small percentage of sales, but I’m more interested in supporting local independent bookstores.

Thanks!

Three Friends, Shifting Feelings…

…and a lot of questions.

39848512Teenagers Courtney Cooper, Rae Chin, and Jupiter Charity-Sanchez form a relationship triangle complicated by questions of sexuality, loyalty and shared trauma. Jupiter and Coop have been best friends since elementary school. African American Coop is straight and Afro-Latinx  Jupe is queer; no one questioned their childhood sleepovers continuing once they  became teens. They have loving, emotionally intimate relationship. Whenever Coop breaks up with a girlfriend Jupe is there to play Queen’s “Another One Bites the Dust,” for their traditional break up dance party. Chinese-Irish Rae Chin moves to town with her doctor father who works at the same hospital as Coop’s mother. Rae connects with Jupe because they’re both biracial and into community service; they become close. Rae grows close to Coop when she learns they had a shared interest as children which is connected for both of them to the traumatic loss of one of their parents. Coop and Jupe feel confident of their sexuality, but Rae is questioning. She finds herself attracted to both of them, and while her feelings are sincere it takes her time to sort them out. A declaration on Rae’s part leads Jupe to make a difficult and selfish decision, resulting in hurt, anger and for her, confusion.

This is the best book dealing with young people’s sexuality that I’ve ever read. The narrative gives a realistic view of how changing circumstances can lead to confusion even when the answers seem certain. It resists labels, pigeonholing and punishment, and shows even people who care deeply about each other can make hurtful mistakes. The honest and engaging characters avoid stereotypes. The structure of the book, 3 sections told from each teen’s perspective and in their own style, adds depth. The teens’ household configurations – Coop and Rae with single parents, Jupe with her two dads – and their connections with their wider friend groups make the story even richer. Despite the serious elements, this book is fun, and will resonate with many readers.

Odd One Out, Nic Stone, Crown Books

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

Find Odd One Out at your your local independent bookstore!