With The Fire on High

Sometimes the heat is what draws you to the kitchen.

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17-year-old Afro-Latinx Emoni Santiago dreams of being a chef. Her creativity in the kitchen is stellar, and her instincts always lead her to new culinary places. But her dream may remain just that. Emoni got pregnant as a high school freshman and is  now raising her 3 year old daughter Emma. They live with Emoni’s grandmother. Emoni’s  mother died when she was a baby and her father felt it was more important for him to go back to Puerto Rico than stay home and care for Emoni. Emoni has a tenuous relationship with the baby’s father who is present for Emma, less so for her. Unsurprisingly her family has serious financial struggles. A new culinary arts class, which includes a trip to Spain to study under local chefs, is offered at her high school. She knows it won’t be easy but she wants this. With an aging grandmother, toddler child, and minimal financial resources, Emoni has to figure out how to make it work.

This book’s author, Elizabeth Acevedo, has won multiple awards for her first book, The Poet X, written in verse. She easily switches to prose here, creating equally compelling storytelling. The narrative doesn’t sugar coat Emoni’s struggles but presents her with full agency. Emoni’s commitment to her education, her daughter and cooking is clear. She creates opportunities and dares to imagine a future for herself. The other people in Emoni’s life are more than backdrops. By providing context for their actions, Acevedo avoids simplistic good/bad characterizations..  This honesty results in a powerful, realistically hopeful story. Warning: read this book near your kitchen – reading about Emoni’s culinary creations will either inspire you to try some of your own or just make you hungry!

With the Fire on High is available now at your local bookstore.

 

Support Your Local Independent Bookstore!

Announcing an update to Books I Can’t Shut Up About! If you’re interested in buying the books I review (and they’re all good!) you can do so right from the review page! I’ve added links to Indie Bound, an affiliation of independent bookstores. You can find a local bookstore and buy the book from them online or visit and buy in person.

From now on, all my reviews will include a link to Indie Bound. To save you some time here are links for the books I’ve reviewed so far. Click the title to see the review, and the book cover to reach Indie Bound:

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Dread Nation

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Kim Reaper: Grim Beginnings

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org  Pitch Dark

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Children of Blood and Bone

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Prince and The Dressmaker

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Anger Is A Gift

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Dactyl Hill Squad

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Monday’s Not Coming

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org The Poet X

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org So Done

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org Ship It

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org   Odd One Out

Yes, I do get a small percentage of sales, but I’m more interested in supporting local independent bookstores.

Thanks!

The Poet X

Words have power, even before they’re spoken.

33294200Xiomara Batista is many things – high school student, twin to Xavier, never quite good enough daughter, and closet poet. She’s being raised in a strict religious household by a mother who really wanted to be a nun and dad whose idea of being a good father is to close off his past life, stay silent and go along with mom. Xiomara is dealing with a lot – questioning her connection to the religion her mother forces on her, trying to be a good friend and ally to her brother who has secrets of his own, dealing with the unwanted attention men feel free to aim at her womanly body, and despite her mother’s harsh lectures about the dangers of dating, accepting that there’s nothing wrong with being attracted to boys. Her only outlet is her poetry; she writes it just for herself, trying to make sense of her thoughts and feelings. Eventually she’s persuaded to join the Spoken Word Poetry Club at school and, with the support of new friends, gains the confidence to share her words. After her first performance at an open mic everything changes. Xiomara’s journey is difficult but she learns how to live within her family while still being herself. Now, she understands that her words serve as both armor and weapon.

This book’s story in verse format serves the narrative very well, successfully making what looks spare on the page truly dense in meaning. The weaving of the overall story with Xiomara’s poetry is emotional, heartbreaking, joyous and powerful. Fully rooted in her Dominican culture, Elizabeth Acevedo paints a moving picture of this young woman, working to filter all the messages directed at her, on her way to discovering her true self.

Elizabeth Acevedo, The Poet X, Harper Teen