The Black Panther Party: A Graphic Novel History

Black Panthers

This graphic novel goes beyond accepted knowledge and myths about the Black Panther Party to tell a complex, well researched history. The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense was created in 1966 in Oakland, CA, but is actually rooted in the oppression of Black people in America, going back to the time of enslavement. The narrative draws a line from that time, through the Civil War to the civil rights movement, showing how the Panthers were inevitable.

In chronicling the history, author David F. Walker often breaks from the narrative panels and uses full pages to take a closer look at people and events. In addition to in depth information about pivotal figures Bobby Seale and Huey P. Newton, we learn more about less well known men and women who were essential to the Panthers’ founding. The narrative documents many of the Panthers’ successes, including launching free nutrition, clothing, education, and medical care programs. The book is equally clear about the Party’s violent acts and internal conflicts. Shifts in leadership and disagreements about priorities and tactics lead to power struggles. We also get an informative deep dive into J. Edgar Hoover’s Counter Intelligence Program. COINTELPRO, as it was known, was the covert, illegal domestic surveillance of political groups. Walker includes a memo outlining the secretive group’s goal of eliminating all organizations advocating for Black power or civil rights. He details how the FBI’s tactics – planting informants, inflaming rivalries between the Panthers and rival organizations and colluding with local law enforcement – significantly weakened the Party.

Marcus Kwame Anderson’s art supports the story beautifully. The realistic renderings bring the people and their experiences to life. The colors are muted but work well to depict both the successes and the struggles of the Party. Overall this graphic novel does a stellar job of conveying the complicated legacy of the Black Panther Party’s people and programs. An extensive bibliography with resources for further reading is included.

Find this compelling graphic novel at your local independent bookstore or comic book shop.

Bitter Root

Sometimes the monsters are right next door.

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Set during the Harlem Renaissance, Bitter Root tells the story of a New York City beset by monsters known as Jinoo, and the African American Sangerye family, the only people with the skills and knowledge to fight them off. It seemed the monsters had been put to rest but recently they have been rising again. This time it’s more difficult for the Sangeryes; the family is divided over methods, as well as who can fight the Jinoo. Even worse, a new creature, more powerful than they’d ever seen, has emerged. The Jinoo themselves used to be human. Their souls were corrupted by racism and violence, turning them into monsters; once turned they infect others. As we get deeper into the story, the battles facing the Sangeryes get more frightening. On the face, this is a good horror story. Looking deeper, the powerful narrative shows how people can allow themselves to be poisoned with hatred to the point where they lose their humanity. The art, in style, tone, and use of a deep, moody color palette, evokes a feeling of ever present danger.

Like the film Get Out, or much of Octavia Butler’s speculative fiction, the events in this reimagined reality provide a different way to examine real world issues. Three issues of this knockout comic series have been released as of this writing. Normally I would wait until the whole series, or possibly the trade version (one volume containing all the issues), had been published, but this comic is so good I couldn’t wait to talk about it.

Head out to your local comic book shop and pick it up! Not sure where your local comic book shop is located? Find it here!